Tag Archives: survival

Survival Tips for Wilderness Vacations

From BransonShows.com

A trip into the wilderness can be a fun and educational experience for those who like to seek adventure outdoors. On the other hand, it can also present a number of hazards that are potentially fatal. In addition to freezing or blistering hot weather, falls, hostile animal encounters, and other dangers, there is also the lack of access to nearby help. It may take hours or days for rescuers to come to one’s aid in the event of an emergency, and delays like this can be deadly. It is important, therefore, for adventurers to understand basic techniques for survival in the wilderness.

Cold Weather Survival

  • A person should keep his or her head covered while in the cold to avoid losing up to 45 percent of his or her body heat.
  • Adjust clothing as needed to avoid overheating and sweating in them. Sweating will not only dampen clothing but it will also make the body cooler when it dries.
  • Wear clothing in loose layers for maximum insulation.
  • Before getting into a sleeping bag, place damp boots between its liner and shell to help dry them off.
  • Carry a fire starter and tinder such as a trioxane bar so that a fire can be started quickly in extreme cold temperatures.

Warm Weather Survival

  • Take frequent breaks when walking or hiking to avoid over-exertion.
  • Moisten a bandanna and place it on the back of one’s neck or forehead to cool down.
  • Wearing a hat with a brim will help keep the sun off of one’s face and the back of the neck.
  • Drink small sips of water throughout the day using urine color as a guide. Darker urine is an indication that the body isn’t getting enough water.
  • If feeling the effects of heat exhaustion, such as vomiting, headache, or dizziness, lie down, elevate the feet, and take a few sips of cool, but not cold, water.

Finding Water and Food

  • Dig a pit and cover it with sticks and other debris to create a pit trap for animals.
  • Ice and snow may be melted for drinking.
  • Insects such as grasshoppers, snails, and crickets are easy to catch and edible if unable to catch game.
  • Make finding water a priority as a person can live longer without food than water.
  • Running water is typically safe for drinking, but boil or add iodine to stagnant water.

Making Fire

  • Create a surface that is reflective enough to start a fire by using a bar of chocolate to polish the bottom of soda can.
  • Use caution around oil and petroleum when in extreme cold conditions as they can cause frostbite if they come into contact with the skin.
  • Use a magnifying glass or pair of glasses to start a fire.
  • Keep waterproof matches in a waterproof container on hand.
  • The simplest and most often used method of starting a fire without matches is the flint and steel method.

Finding Shelter

  • The entrance to the shelter should face opposite the direction of the wind.
  • Use caution when building a shelter near a creek as they can rise at night.
  • Do not build a shelter in an area where water may collect if heavy rains begin during the night.
  • If the ground is wet, build a platform made of stout branches.
  • Trees with branches that extend outward can be used as shelter against rain.

Finding and Creating Tools

  • Use rocks from riverbeds or creeks to create cutting tools.
  • Make the first break in the stone by bashing two rocks together in what is called the rock-bash technique.
  • Always wear eye protection when creating tools from rock and other natural materials to avoid injury to the eye from flying fragments.
  • To make arrows, use straight shoots from willow, dogwood, or maple trees.
  • Dogbane, nettle or milkweed can be used to make the cord of a bow.

Finding Help and Rescue

  • Use a whistle to alert rescue teams.
  • Strategically placed clothing can be used to alert planes of one’s location. Clothing should contrast with its surroundings and care should be taken if climbing up a tree or some other high location.
  • The sun and a shiny object such as a mirror can be used to signal rescuers.
  • Partially smother a fire to create smoke. This is best on clear days when the smoke will be most visible to rescuers.
  • Use fire to attract help at night. Fires should be built in elevated locations and in areas with minimal vegetation.

General Survival Tips

  • When preparing for an outdoor excursion, always carry a first aid kit for potential emergencies.
  • Study the lay of the land before heading into any wilderness area.
  • Unless equipped with a compass and knowledge of where they are, people should stay put when lost in the wilderness.
  • Carry a personal beacon when traveling in isolated areas such as the wilderness. This enables Search and Rescue teams to find the wearer.
  • If a person becomes lost he or she should stop and set priorities before taking any action. For example, if it is close to nightfall finding shelter should be a top priority.

Additional Tips

  • Outdoor Skills – Survival: This is a page on the Texas Parks and Wildlife website: The page gives illustrated directions on building a survival fire and also how to obtain water in an emergency. The page also includes links to other survival skills for campers including water safety and signaling for help.
  • How to Start and Create a Fire: This page gives very brief explanation of how to arrange logs to make a fire. It also reviews what is needed to start the fire, such as matches, flint, eyeglasses, etc.
  • British Columbia Outdoor Wilderness Guide: Wilderness Survival – Food and Water: This page discusses various ways that people can find and/or catch food when in the wild. It also reviews how to find water that is safe to drink.
  • Nature Skills: How to Purify Water: Click on this link for an article that discusses the need for protecting oneself from organisms found in outdoor water sources. The article reviews how to purify water so that it is safe drink.
  • United States Search and Rescue Task Force: General Land Survival Tips: This link opens to a page on the United States Search and Rescue website that gives readers information on how to survive in the wilderness. The information is basic and is presented in bullet format.
  • Seven tips to Survive the Frozen Wilderness: This link directs readers to the Ultimate Survival Alaska page on the National Geographic Channel. The article provides tips on how to survive in freezing and frozen conditions. Tips include building a shelter and how to recognize and treat signs of frostbite.
  • Government of the Northwest Territories – Tourism and Parks Wilderness Survival Tips: This page provides basic survival skill for people who enjoy time outdoors in the wilderness. The article lists various topics at the top of the page. The reader may scroll down to review each topic or he or she may click on the topic title to go directly to the information. Topics include signaling, shelter, and staying where you are.
  • The Do-it-Yourself Coffee Can Survival Kit: This page takes readers to directions for creating a survival kit. The article lists what general items are needed in the kit and explains key points to remember when creating the kit.
  • Cold Weather Survival Tips: This page explains what the four basic principles of surviving in cold weather are. Fire types are also reviewed in addition to the physical and psychological benefits of building a fire.
  • Discovery News: Desert Survival Eight Simple Tips That Could Save Your Life: Clicking on this link opens up a page to the Discovery website. The article lists eight ways that people can survive outdoors in the heat or desert-like conditions. Tips range from finding shelter to staying hydrated.
  • Health Concerns: This page reviews what items are important when traveling through a desert or in an area with high temperatures. The need for water to prevent dehydration is the primary topic of discussion.
  • How to Find Water: This article discusses areas where a person might find water in the desert. It also briefly discusses dew as a very limited water source.
  • Mother Earth News — Outdoor Survival Skills: How to Start a Fire: Clicking on this link will take the reader to an article that explains several methods of how to make a fire. Readers will learn how to start a fire by using a bow and drill and flint and steel. They will also learn about materials to use for the bearing block, about a fire board, and material types for tinder.
  • Field & Stream: Seven Ways to Light a Fire Without Matches: Click this link to go directly to the Field and Stream website and learn how to start a fire without the use of matches. The article is in a slide-show format.
  • Men’s Fitness – Twelve Outdoor Survival Skills Every Guy Should Master: This article lists outdoor survival skills that a person should know how to perform if lost or stranded in the wilderness. Listed skills include building a fire and collecting water.
  • Backpacker: Survival Skills 101: This link opens a PDF document about survival skills. The document is an in-depth overview of how a person can survive when in dangerous situations outdoors.
  • How to Make Shelter in the Wilderness: Click on this link for step-by-step instructions on how to build shelter outdoors. The article includes a detailed list of what is needed to accomplish the shelter.
  • Popular Mechanics: Six Key Emergency Survival Tips from Wilderness Experts: On this page readers are given tips on six emergency situations that a person may face out in the wild. Tips include how to protect oneself from hypothermia and snake bites.
  • Wilderness Survival – Cold Weather Survival: On this page readers will find information about surviving in cold weather conditions. The page also includes links to further survival information on the website.
  • Army Ranger Rick’s Outdoor Survival Tips: On this page the reader will find a list of links to tips that will help people survive in outdoor conditions.
  • Alderleaf Wilderness College – Primitive Stone Tools: Clicking on this link will take the reader to a web page that explains how to make tools from stone. The article also discusses how to find materials.
PG
About The Author: RSOP is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine, as well as a Family Preparedness Consultant with nearly five years of personal experience in the self-reliance game. RSOP's many preparedness roles within his own group include team mechanic, head of security, electrician, and project designer/engineer.

Preview: Expatriates by James Wesley, Rawles

Front cover

Front cover

Coming October, 1st, 2013!

“In the latest survivalist thriller from founder of survivalblog.com and New York Times bestselling author James Wesley, Rawles, two expat families struggle for their very survival in the midst of a global economic collapse.”

“When the United States suffers a major socioeconomic collapse, a power vacuum sweeps the globe. A newly radicalized Islamic government rises to power in Indonesia, invades the Philippines, East Timor, Papua New Guinea, and finally northern Australia. No longer protected by American military interests, Australia must repel an invasion alone.

In the thick of these political maneuvers, an American family of missionaries living in the Philippines and a Texan petroleum engineer in Australia must face the fear of being strangers in a world in flux. Are their relatives back home healthy and safe? Will they ever see them again?

In its depiction of the authentic survivalist skills and techniques needed to survive a global socioeconomic meltdown, Expatriates is as informative as it is suspense-filled.”

About the Author:

JAMES WESLEY, RAWLES is a former U.S. Army intelligence officer and survivalist, and a well-known survival lecturer and author. Rawles is the editor of SurvivalBlog.com—the nation’s most popular blog on family preparedness. He lives in an undisclosed location west of the Rockies and is the author of the bestselling Founders: A Novel of the Coming Collapse, Survivors: A Novel of the Coming Collapse, Patriots: A Novel of Survival in the Coming Collapse, and a nonfiction survival guide, How to Survive the End of the World as We Know It.

Book Details:

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Dutton Adult (October 1, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0525953906
  • ISBN-13: 978-0525953906
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.9 x 1.2 inches

Special thanks to Dutton Publishing for supplying us with a preview/review sample!

PG
About The Author: RSOP is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine, as well as a Family Preparedness Consultant with nearly five years of personal experience in the self-reliance game. RSOP's many preparedness roles within his own group include team mechanic, head of security, electrician, and project designer/engineer.

RV Ops: Preparing Your Base Camp

Entering into a survivalist situation often means having to think on your feet. And sometimes, it means having to think on your back as well. Or, to be more specific, about how and where you intend to bunker down each night.

Preparing a camp isn’t simply a matter of pitching a tent and unrolling a sleeping mat. There are all sorts of things to consider when you’re in a survivalist situation; such as, how to make fire without being seen, how to sleep (or not) on wet ground, and how you should prepare for inclement weather or hostile conditions.

With these factors in mind, it becomes clear that preparing a base camp will take careful consideration. But if you prepare in advance you’ll find that, when it comes time to put your plans into action, everything will go smoothly.

Packing for a Survivalist Situation

When it comes to packing, the old adage is ‘pack light’. But when it comes to preparing your base camp, this doesn’t mean you have to sacrifice on any of the essentials. You basic camping kit should contain:

  • A medical kit, including antiseptic, plasters and bandages.
  • Food; dry goods, energy bars and tins.
  • Water, and a water purifying system.
  • A cooker, and cooking equipment.
  • Firelighters, including a tinder box and flints.
  • A sleeping mat, sleeping bag and tent, AND
  • A hammock.
  • A navigation kit, including torch, compass, notebook, map etc.
  • Sharps and tools, including a hatchet, Swiss army knife and safety pin.

These items will form the basis of your survival checklist – the absolute bare minimum of what you will need in an outdoor survivalist situation.

How to Prepare Your Camp

Choosing the location of your camp is the first important part of setting your camp up. It doesn’t matter if you’re bunking down for just one night, or if you intend to ride out a few seasons in the same location. A well chosen spot will aid you in the event of your needing to find food, water or an escape route. With this in mind, camping with your back to a cliff or steep incline is a great idea, as you’ll also be protected from the wind.

The type of camp you will set up will be dependent upon a number of factors, including how permanent your camp will be, what the weather and ground conditions are like, and whether or not you expect to encounter any nasty bugs, predators or other dangers. If in doubt, opt for a hammock. Sleeping above the ground will offer you the best protection from most natural hazards.

PG
About The Author: Daniel Stratton is a freelance writer with an interest in outdoors and prepping topics. Most of the goods mentioned above can be found at http://rvops.co.uk who specialize in outdoors, tactical and similar gear and items.

Stressed & Depressed: Americans ‘Snapping’ By The Millions

Stressed & Depressed: Americans ‘Snapping’ By The Millions

David Kupelian reveals record fear, stress, suicide – and inspired way out

“Terrorism. Chaos. Fear of the future. In the age of Obama, America is undergoing a “fundamental transformation” – that much everyone knows.

But what few seem to realize about this transformation is that the sheer stress of living in today’s America is driving tens of millions to the point of illness, depression and self-destruction. Consider the following trends…”

READ MORE:
PG
About The Author: RSOP is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine, as well as a Family Preparedness Consultant with nearly five years of personal experience in the self-reliance game. RSOP's many preparedness roles within his own group include team mechanic, head of security, electrician, and project designer/engineer.

12 Survival Items You May Have Overlooked

From The Prepper Journal | On March 27th, 2013

“When we talk about survival, there are certain items that immediately come to mind. We start with the discussion of beans, bullets and band-aids. This logically flows to having at least a 30 day supply of food, firearms and ammo to defend your home or retreat and medical instruments and supplies to take care of a variety of injuries in an emergency. This gets you the basics and then we talk about extending those provisions to last longer time periods, support more extreme scenarios or to include additional bodies…”

READ MORE:

http://www.theprepperjournal.com/2013/03/27/12-survival-items-you-may-have-overlooked/

PG
About The Author: RSOP is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine, as well as a Family Preparedness Consultant with nearly five years of personal experience in the self-reliance game. RSOP's many preparedness roles within his own group include team mechanic, head of security, electrician, and project designer/engineer.

Mental Illness After The Collapse

Dealing With Mentally Unbalanced Trespassers – Survival Blog

“The biggest weakness in preparedness planning is not a forgotten survival item, or too few cartridges. The invisible weakness is lack of real time experience. It’s one thing to say your going to raise your own food, and maybe you have all the seeds and tools to do it stored away. But if you have never actually planted a huge garden and tried to live off it your first year is going to be full of failures (see: learning opportunities) that could be potentially deadly in real survival time. The same goes for every aspect of survival and emergency situation response. Personally I have always wondered how I would react in a real SHTF situation. Would I freeze? React too slowly? Freak out?…”

READ MORE:

http://www.survivalblog.com/2013/03/dealing-with-mentally-unbalanced-trespassers-by-hearthkeeper.html

PG
About The Author: RSOP is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine, as well as a Family Preparedness Consultant with nearly five years of personal experience in the self-reliance game. RSOP's many preparedness roles within his own group include team mechanic, head of security, electrician, and project designer/engineer.

Five Rules For Survival

By Riverwalker | From StealthSurvival.Blogspot.com | On Sunday, March 17th, 2013

You must be prepared to take any and all actions necessary if you find yourself in a survival situation.  You will need to be prepared to utilize any and all resources in order to insure your survival. Your skills and your knowledge may be put to the ultimate test. This will be a test that you can’t afford to fail.

Five Rules for Survival

Rule #1 – There are no rules. In a survival situation, your actions shouldn’t be bound by arbitrary rules that may exist and be essential to maintain order and stability in normal times. Things are not going to be anywhere close to normal in a survival situation until you’ve managed to get control of your circumstances.

Rule #2 – There is no guarantee of survival. Despite your best efforts, you or a member of your family or group may not survive. You will need to be prepared for this eventuality if it happens. There will still be family members or others in your group that may be depending upon you for help and guidance.

Rule #3 – There is no second chance. You will need to give it your best effort the first time if you want to survive. You probably won’t get a second chance.

Rule #4 – Don’t depend upon luck to save you. Your luck has probably run out if you find yourself in a survival situation. Put your faith in your knowledge and skills to help you survive.

Rule #5 – Never give up. If you give up, you lose the battle for survival. It’s really that simple.

Got rules for survival?

Staying above the water line!

Riverwalker

Source: http://stealthsurvival.blogspot.com/2013/03/five-rules-for-survival.html

PG
About The Author: RSOP is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine, as well as a Family Preparedness Consultant with nearly five years of personal experience in the self-reliance game. RSOP's many preparedness roles within his own group include team mechanic, head of security, electrician, and project designer/engineer.

SHTF Water Sources

SHTF Water Sources – http://uscrow.org

“Emergency SHTF water sources are useful to urban dwellers who’ve bugged in, depleting their water reserves. The electricity is off, this means the pumps are no longer working and water’s nowhere to be found. Don’t sweat it; there are ways to get the water you need…”

Read More: http://uscrow.org/2013/02/15/shtf-water-sources/

PG
About The Author: RSOP is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine, as well as a Family Preparedness Consultant with nearly five years of personal experience in the self-reliance game. RSOP's many preparedness roles within his own group include team mechanic, head of security, electrician, and project designer/engineer.

Developing Basic Barter Networks

By Partisan | from GuerrillaAmerica.com | On October 9th, 2012

Rule Number 1: You will live in a barter economy and you must be a producer or offer a valuable service.  Those who own the means of production or who can independently produce a valuable good, who are proficient in their trades, or who can readily prepare and distribute products to market are economic survivors, plain and simple.

Rule Number 2: You must have cash, durable goods, or precious metals to use as currency.  There could be a disruption of the system that doesn’t harm the perceived value of the dollar, which is a great reason to keep some on hand – especially if you can offload them for something you need after a catastrophic event occurs.

Rule Number 3: The width and depth of your “tribal network” will determine the quality of your life above survival. Pre-collapse, you must meet medical providers, those with means of mass transportation (truck drivers, delivery drivers, etc.), others in the “merchant class”, radio operators, local law enforcement, and all your neighbors.  These people are going to facilitate transactions so you can meet your immediate needs.

Rule Number 4: You must have a means of communication aside from land line or cellular phones.  In a grid down situation, cellular towers will not work.  You need a shortwave radio and a citizens band radio, at a very minimum, to keep up-to-date with your environment, external factors, and emergencies. These will allow you to communicate short range with your neighbors and others in your community; and will be a highly effective way to barter or make trade agreements.  Information regarding external factors such as aid or community meetings will be communicated over radio waves.  Finally, if you cannot communicate in an emergency, you or someone you know will become a casualty.  Similarly, your community must set up its own farmers market/trading post.  Supply and demand will make themselves aware here.  Farmers markets aren’t just for goods; they’re also places where you can make yourself available if you provide a service or find someone who provides a service you need.

Rule Number 5: Your community must have a mechanism to enforce basic laws.  Theft, unlawful violence, and the unlawful threat of violence can derail your community’s ability to trade.  If you have goods to trade or you need goods from someone else, those items must arrive safely and on time.  Maybe your local law enforcement will not be affected; but maybe it will – and what then?  If you have no plan to secure yourself and your property then you will not thrive, much less survive.

Source: http://guerrillamerica.com/2012/10/developing-basic-barter-networks/

PG
About The Author: RSOP is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine, as well as a Family Preparedness Consultant with nearly five years of personal experience in the self-reliance game. RSOP's many preparedness roles within his own group include team mechanic, head of security, electrician, and project designer/engineer.

7 Tips To Prepare For Hard Times

By Gaye Levy | From BackdoorSurvival.com | On Thursday, February 21st, 2013

Once you have been blogging for awhile, you begin to realize that bad news – and by bad news I mean the unthinkable – sells. Funny how that works but following a natural disaster or major world event, site visits go up – way up.  When my friend George at Urban Survival first told me this I was incredulous.  But sure enough, it is true.

On the other hand, there is no reason why we should not prepare for the unthinkable even during those times when things are status quo.  (And did you notice I did not say normal although the new normal is the status quo – as tough as it may be to stomach.)

Today I would like to share a list of tips for preparing for unthinkable hard times.  It is a quick and dirty list – things that come to mind here and now in the present moment.  I am sure there are others.

7 TIPS TO PREPARE FOR HARD TIMES

1.  Practice using less electricity – a lot less electricity

I just finished the audio book version of One Second After.  An EMP, coupled the the potential of a cyber attack, tell me that it is only prudent to get by with less reliance on the electrical grid.  For many, the problem of limited or non-existent electrical power can be mitigated by generators or solar power.  Generators are great as long as you have fuel and solar power will work if you have the money to set up a solar system plus, of course, an abundance of sun.

To me, the optimal solution is to try to get by with less electrical power.  That means less reliance on my two freezers full of food and more reliance on bulk foods and freeze-dried meals.  It also means lots of batteries and some wind-up devices.

Lots of Batteries

Plan on Having Lots of Spare Batteries in all Sizes

2.  Maintain a survival library and a survival notebook

The time may come when your online resources may no longer be available.  Perhaps, as mentioned above, the grid may be down.  Or perhaps the internet will be censored with survival and preparedness sites blocked.  It could happen, you know.

Accumulate some preparedness books in print form and maintain your own survival notebook in a three ring binder.  Don’t overlook free resources that may be available from your local county or state emergency management department.  Even FEMA has some good stuff in printed form (see Free for You: The “Are You Ready Guide to Preparedness”.

3.  Make learning a habit

Set aside a brief period each week to either learn a new skill or practice becoming more proficient at a skill you already possess.  Better yet, take some time – even a few minutes – each day to find a new trick or tip to add to your survival notebook.

Amazon frequently offers free e-books on a variety of topics.  These books are typically only available for one to five days and are a great way to learn something new.  Sure, they may not be available if the power is out but if the goal is to learn from them, take notes and put what you learn into action now rather than later.

One of the most important things you can do now to prepare for a crisis or disaster is to always be learning.

Side note: On most days I post a link of two to relevant free e-book over on my Facebook page.

Vertical Garden in Shoe Pockets

Try vertical gardening – you do not need a lot of space for herbs & greens

4.  Grow food

Growing your own food can be so rewarding that I just can not fathom even the smallest apartment dweller not growing at least a pot full of herbs on their window sill.  There is something magical about popping a few seeds in a pot and watching them sprout and grow into something that is actually edible.

Beyond the window sill garden, there is the container garden, bucket garden, square foot garden, vertical garden, raised bed garden and the mini-farm.  No matter how difficult it may seem, check out some videos on YouTube or books from your local library and start growing some food this spring.

5.  Acknowledge that there will be fear and panic

Those of you that have experienced a disaster, poor health, job loss, or civil disobedience and war will understand that fear and panic are inevitable.  Realize that in the case of a disaster, there is not a darn thing you can do other than recover.  Plan for the worst and hope for the best.  A cliché, I know. But that is the truth.

Other woes such as poor health, los of a job or a financial meltdown are a bit more difficult to deal with.  Questions such as how will you cope and how will you live will cross your mind as you stay up nights wondering what you could have done to mitigate the situation in the first place.

Acknowledge now that there will be fear and panic and realize this is WHY you prep.  Prepping is the insurance policy that will help see you through hard times.

6.  Embrace companionship and love

Not to get dopey, but life is more robust when you have someone to hug.  I like to say “hug the ones you love, and love the ones you hug.”

I would also like to suggest that you share a modest portion of your bounty with your less fortunate or elderly neighbors.  I would also like to suggest that you share your kindness when kindness is shared with you in turn. Life is precious and at the end of our time, it won’t be the fancy cars, the elaborate home, or the diamond rings that count. It is will the feeling of peace knowing that you have lived well with love in your soul and compassion in your heart.

7.  Maintain your faith

If you are a religious person, find comfort in your faith.  And if not, embrace your inner strength and have faith in yourself and in the miracle of your life.  Hold this faith near to your heart – when hard times come, it may be all that you have left.

THE FINAL WORD

Coping skills when the SHTF will be easier said than done.

Being realistic, it is difficult to predict what will happen and how we will react as individuals if and when we are faced with extremely hard times.  For whatever reason – a disaster or personal crisis – we will each have to deal with situations that are foreign and unpleasant.  Having the food, water, gear and the other tools of the prepping trade will help, but I can’t help but think that there are many other things that can be done now to prepare for the worst.

I encourage you to embrace the less tangible aspects of preparedness and consider events of the day a wake up call advising you to get on with life in the best and most human way possible.

Enjoy your next adventure through common sense and thoughtful preparation!

Gaye

Source: http://www.backdoorsurvival.com/7-tips-to-prepare-for-hard-times/

PG
About The Author: RSOP is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine, as well as a Family Preparedness Consultant with nearly five years of personal experience in the self-reliance game. RSOP's many preparedness roles within his own group include team mechanic, head of security, electrician, and project designer/engineer.