Category Archives: Prepping for Kids

When Did We Become so Afraid?

As someone who in the last year has moved from prepper acquisition mode of material goods to prepper acquisition mode of knowledge, one universal thought from the preparedness community has become painfully apparent: When did we all become so afraid? I am certainly not speaking of scary movies, a final exam, or a speech in front of colleagues. What I am referring to here are items of necessity to survival that were virtually the only items taken for granted by our long-dead relatives.

Although I spend what often feels like countless, wasteful hours on Facebook preparedness pages in search of information that will assist in keeping my family alive, I typically “stalk” said pages rather than participate. Why? Of course you would ask because after all, I am a self described harbinger of preparedness prep. The answer is a simple one. So many people have become afraid that they are paralyzed and therefore plunged into helplessness, or so ego-riffic in their fear (“THAT WILL NEVER HAPPEN IN MY LIFETIME”) that they are just as paralyzed into non-learning as the helpless.

What often frustrates me the most is fear of pressure canning. Sure, there will be the occasional failure. Yet so many have become completely terrified of a relatively simple process that has been around since 1810. Yes, 1810! Our technology today compared to that of 19th century is that the guess factor has been removed from the equation from tried and true scientific recipes provided by such sources as Ball (canning jar maker extraordinaire,) and NCHFP (National Center for Home Food Preservation.) We are constantly inundated with such information as botulism reigns supreme in any household kitchen. Botulism (spores that can produce a deadly food borne toxin,) can live on soil and in water. However, the truth is that the nearly all of botulism cases in any given year are related to improperly stored baby food and the consumption of whale blubber, not home canned foods, which is so often blamed for botulism contamination. Follow the directions. Store. Heat. Eat. Live.

“I’m afraid to try canning” (food.) “I am afraid of lye” (soap making.) “I am afraid to own chickens” (or rabbits, or goats.) “I’m afraid to tell my family or spouse that I’m prepping.” “I am afraid to start a garden.” “I am afraid to spend money on extra food.” “I’m afraid of guns.” “I am afraid to start prepping and then nothing will happen.” “I’m afraid if I prep, then something will happen.”

These are just a sampling of my favorites. I am sure that you would have heard many of these useless one-liners as well. What is so disturbing about this sense of complacency is really the indicator of dependency. This dependency on some entity or organization is terrifying. Individuals and families are actively, not passively making a choice to leave their fate in the hands of someone else. And this is simply due to some unwarranted fear. Assuming this complacency really means that you believe without doubt that every other entity that exists to be your savior is completely infallible and omnipotent. What I really want to say here is that if your lights go off and stay off, then the lights are going to be off at that imaginary location that is providing the individuals that are supposed to come and save you from your lack of preparedness. You will continue to be dependent on those that show mercy, that is, IF they show mercy. We are all just humans, after all. Savior organization or not.

Considering that our long dead relatives often set out on the open frontier to find adventure, how do we look in the mirror every day and continue to accept dependence? Our great-great grandparents did not have gas stations and interstates to follow and GPS on which to rely. They didn’t have air conditioning and Motel 6. They didn’t have cell phones to call for help and bottled water to drink. They weren’t dependent, they weren’t complacent, and even if they had moments of being afraid of some known or unknown threat such as thieves, war, famine, disease, or wild animals, they weren’t plunged into learned helplessness. Where we as a society take for granted material goods, our Iphone, our laptop or Blackberry, our distant relatives only took for granted their knowledge and their perseverance. They relied on their technology of the day, such as trapping or hunting and preserving their food, sewing, knitting, water purification and the like.

We should take a lesson from our forefather’s rule book of survival: hope for the best, but prepare for the worst. Families relied on tried and true knowledge passed down from previous generations and embraced new ideas, rather than expounding on the foolishness of old techniques and letting fear be their un-motivator. In those days, complacency and dependency all too often would lead to death.

For those who are currently looking down the road to find ways to protect their families, I would offer my own simple thought: instead of letting fear conquer you, use it as your motivator. Use your fear as a motivation to learn. Let fear be your guide. For example, from your preparedness list, select the one concept that creates within you the most fear, and make it your prep challenge for the week or month. If you perform, or often have opportunity to be in front of a lot of people, look at this as the best kind of stage fright. Consider this time, right now, your dress rehearsal. And boy, you better have your lines memorized. The worst time to acquire new knowledge is during a SHTF scenario. It is time to give your best performance ever. Not giving this your best effort NOW may eventually result in death, whether it is your death, or the death of your loved ones.

As a mother, I certainly don’t want to look back and think that I could have, or I should have tried harder to protect my family and that my fear kept me from doing so. The stakes are just too high.

PG
About The Author: MOTH (Mother Of The House) is the Co-founder and Editor-In-Chief of Radical Survivalism Webzine.

Survival Tips for Wilderness Vacations

From BransonShows.com

A trip into the wilderness can be a fun and educational experience for those who like to seek adventure outdoors. On the other hand, it can also present a number of hazards that are potentially fatal. In addition to freezing or blistering hot weather, falls, hostile animal encounters, and other dangers, there is also the lack of access to nearby help. It may take hours or days for rescuers to come to one’s aid in the event of an emergency, and delays like this can be deadly. It is important, therefore, for adventurers to understand basic techniques for survival in the wilderness.

Cold Weather Survival

  • A person should keep his or her head covered while in the cold to avoid losing up to 45 percent of his or her body heat.
  • Adjust clothing as needed to avoid overheating and sweating in them. Sweating will not only dampen clothing but it will also make the body cooler when it dries.
  • Wear clothing in loose layers for maximum insulation.
  • Before getting into a sleeping bag, place damp boots between its liner and shell to help dry them off.
  • Carry a fire starter and tinder such as a trioxane bar so that a fire can be started quickly in extreme cold temperatures.

Warm Weather Survival

  • Take frequent breaks when walking or hiking to avoid over-exertion.
  • Moisten a bandanna and place it on the back of one’s neck or forehead to cool down.
  • Wearing a hat with a brim will help keep the sun off of one’s face and the back of the neck.
  • Drink small sips of water throughout the day using urine color as a guide. Darker urine is an indication that the body isn’t getting enough water.
  • If feeling the effects of heat exhaustion, such as vomiting, headache, or dizziness, lie down, elevate the feet, and take a few sips of cool, but not cold, water.

Finding Water and Food

  • Dig a pit and cover it with sticks and other debris to create a pit trap for animals.
  • Ice and snow may be melted for drinking.
  • Insects such as grasshoppers, snails, and crickets are easy to catch and edible if unable to catch game.
  • Make finding water a priority as a person can live longer without food than water.
  • Running water is typically safe for drinking, but boil or add iodine to stagnant water.

Making Fire

  • Create a surface that is reflective enough to start a fire by using a bar of chocolate to polish the bottom of soda can.
  • Use caution around oil and petroleum when in extreme cold conditions as they can cause frostbite if they come into contact with the skin.
  • Use a magnifying glass or pair of glasses to start a fire.
  • Keep waterproof matches in a waterproof container on hand.
  • The simplest and most often used method of starting a fire without matches is the flint and steel method.

Finding Shelter

  • The entrance to the shelter should face opposite the direction of the wind.
  • Use caution when building a shelter near a creek as they can rise at night.
  • Do not build a shelter in an area where water may collect if heavy rains begin during the night.
  • If the ground is wet, build a platform made of stout branches.
  • Trees with branches that extend outward can be used as shelter against rain.

Finding and Creating Tools

  • Use rocks from riverbeds or creeks to create cutting tools.
  • Make the first break in the stone by bashing two rocks together in what is called the rock-bash technique.
  • Always wear eye protection when creating tools from rock and other natural materials to avoid injury to the eye from flying fragments.
  • To make arrows, use straight shoots from willow, dogwood, or maple trees.
  • Dogbane, nettle or milkweed can be used to make the cord of a bow.

Finding Help and Rescue

  • Use a whistle to alert rescue teams.
  • Strategically placed clothing can be used to alert planes of one’s location. Clothing should contrast with its surroundings and care should be taken if climbing up a tree or some other high location.
  • The sun and a shiny object such as a mirror can be used to signal rescuers.
  • Partially smother a fire to create smoke. This is best on clear days when the smoke will be most visible to rescuers.
  • Use fire to attract help at night. Fires should be built in elevated locations and in areas with minimal vegetation.

General Survival Tips

  • When preparing for an outdoor excursion, always carry a first aid kit for potential emergencies.
  • Study the lay of the land before heading into any wilderness area.
  • Unless equipped with a compass and knowledge of where they are, people should stay put when lost in the wilderness.
  • Carry a personal beacon when traveling in isolated areas such as the wilderness. This enables Search and Rescue teams to find the wearer.
  • If a person becomes lost he or she should stop and set priorities before taking any action. For example, if it is close to nightfall finding shelter should be a top priority.

Additional Tips

  • Outdoor Skills – Survival: This is a page on the Texas Parks and Wildlife website: The page gives illustrated directions on building a survival fire and also how to obtain water in an emergency. The page also includes links to other survival skills for campers including water safety and signaling for help.
  • How to Start and Create a Fire: This page gives very brief explanation of how to arrange logs to make a fire. It also reviews what is needed to start the fire, such as matches, flint, eyeglasses, etc.
  • British Columbia Outdoor Wilderness Guide: Wilderness Survival – Food and Water: This page discusses various ways that people can find and/or catch food when in the wild. It also reviews how to find water that is safe to drink.
  • Nature Skills: How to Purify Water: Click on this link for an article that discusses the need for protecting oneself from organisms found in outdoor water sources. The article reviews how to purify water so that it is safe drink.
  • United States Search and Rescue Task Force: General Land Survival Tips: This link opens to a page on the United States Search and Rescue website that gives readers information on how to survive in the wilderness. The information is basic and is presented in bullet format.
  • Seven tips to Survive the Frozen Wilderness: This link directs readers to the Ultimate Survival Alaska page on the National Geographic Channel. The article provides tips on how to survive in freezing and frozen conditions. Tips include building a shelter and how to recognize and treat signs of frostbite.
  • Government of the Northwest Territories – Tourism and Parks Wilderness Survival Tips: This page provides basic survival skill for people who enjoy time outdoors in the wilderness. The article lists various topics at the top of the page. The reader may scroll down to review each topic or he or she may click on the topic title to go directly to the information. Topics include signaling, shelter, and staying where you are.
  • The Do-it-Yourself Coffee Can Survival Kit: This page takes readers to directions for creating a survival kit. The article lists what general items are needed in the kit and explains key points to remember when creating the kit.
  • Cold Weather Survival Tips: This page explains what the four basic principles of surviving in cold weather are. Fire types are also reviewed in addition to the physical and psychological benefits of building a fire.
  • Discovery News: Desert Survival Eight Simple Tips That Could Save Your Life: Clicking on this link opens up a page to the Discovery website. The article lists eight ways that people can survive outdoors in the heat or desert-like conditions. Tips range from finding shelter to staying hydrated.
  • Health Concerns: This page reviews what items are important when traveling through a desert or in an area with high temperatures. The need for water to prevent dehydration is the primary topic of discussion.
  • How to Find Water: This article discusses areas where a person might find water in the desert. It also briefly discusses dew as a very limited water source.
  • Mother Earth News — Outdoor Survival Skills: How to Start a Fire: Clicking on this link will take the reader to an article that explains several methods of how to make a fire. Readers will learn how to start a fire by using a bow and drill and flint and steel. They will also learn about materials to use for the bearing block, about a fire board, and material types for tinder.
  • Field & Stream: Seven Ways to Light a Fire Without Matches: Click this link to go directly to the Field and Stream website and learn how to start a fire without the use of matches. The article is in a slide-show format.
  • Men’s Fitness – Twelve Outdoor Survival Skills Every Guy Should Master: This article lists outdoor survival skills that a person should know how to perform if lost or stranded in the wilderness. Listed skills include building a fire and collecting water.
  • Backpacker: Survival Skills 101: This link opens a PDF document about survival skills. The document is an in-depth overview of how a person can survive when in dangerous situations outdoors.
  • How to Make Shelter in the Wilderness: Click on this link for step-by-step instructions on how to build shelter outdoors. The article includes a detailed list of what is needed to accomplish the shelter.
  • Popular Mechanics: Six Key Emergency Survival Tips from Wilderness Experts: On this page readers are given tips on six emergency situations that a person may face out in the wild. Tips include how to protect oneself from hypothermia and snake bites.
  • Wilderness Survival – Cold Weather Survival: On this page readers will find information about surviving in cold weather conditions. The page also includes links to further survival information on the website.
  • Army Ranger Rick’s Outdoor Survival Tips: On this page the reader will find a list of links to tips that will help people survive in outdoor conditions.
  • Alderleaf Wilderness College – Primitive Stone Tools: Clicking on this link will take the reader to a web page that explains how to make tools from stone. The article also discusses how to find materials.
PG
About The Author: RSOP is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine, as well as a Family Preparedness Consultant with nearly five years of personal experience in the self-reliance game. RSOP's many preparedness roles within his own group include team mechanic, head of security, electrician, and project designer/engineer.

12 Survival Items You May Have Overlooked

From The Prepper Journal | On March 27th, 2013

“When we talk about survival, there are certain items that immediately come to mind. We start with the discussion of beans, bullets and band-aids. This logically flows to having at least a 30 day supply of food, firearms and ammo to defend your home or retreat and medical instruments and supplies to take care of a variety of injuries in an emergency. This gets you the basics and then we talk about extending those provisions to last longer time periods, support more extreme scenarios or to include additional bodies…”

READ MORE:

http://www.theprepperjournal.com/2013/03/27/12-survival-items-you-may-have-overlooked/

PG
About The Author: RSOP is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine, as well as a Family Preparedness Consultant with nearly five years of personal experience in the self-reliance game. RSOP's many preparedness roles within his own group include team mechanic, head of security, electrician, and project designer/engineer.

Making An Emergency Injectable Local Anesthetic

Guest Post: How To Make Injectable Lidocaine HCL

“Almost every other prepper / survivalist that I’ve met shares a similar “hope for the best, but prepare for the worst” philosophy about life. If this pretty much describes you too, than you’ve probably considered a SHTF situation where, with no access to doctors or dentists, you might be forced to perform some type of minor surgery at home. Draining an abscess or pulling a tooth maybe. These are common minor surgeries, but with no anesthesia (or only over-the-counter varieties) they might be very painful. You’ve probably also thought about how you might treat trauma, like lacerations, punctures, or burns – where suturing, debriding, or removing foreign objects from a wound might be necessary. Painful enough for an adult, but worse for a child to have to endure. And while no sane person really wants to think about the worst cases, like having to treat a gunshot, knife, or chainsaw injury to a loved one, you know that ignoring the possibility doesn’t make it any less likely to happen either…”

READ MORE:

http://modernsurvivalonline.com/guest-post-how-to-make-injectable-lidocaine-hcl/

PG
About The Author: RSOP is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine, as well as a Family Preparedness Consultant with nearly five years of personal experience in the self-reliance game. RSOP's many preparedness roles within his own group include team mechanic, head of security, electrician, and project designer/engineer.

How To Recharge Alkaline Batteries

How To Recharge Alkaline Batteries – Backdoor Survival

“About a month ago, I learned that it was possible not not only to test old alkaline batteries to see if they are still are usable, but also that, with the right type of charger, you can bring dead batteries back to life and that you can actually recharge alkaline batteries. To be quite honest, I was blown away…”

READ MORE:

http://www.backdoorsurvival.com/how-to-recharge-alkaline-batteries/

PG
About The Author: RSOP is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine, as well as a Family Preparedness Consultant with nearly five years of personal experience in the self-reliance game. RSOP's many preparedness roles within his own group include team mechanic, head of security, electrician, and project designer/engineer.

Mental Illness After The Collapse

Dealing With Mentally Unbalanced Trespassers – Survival Blog

“The biggest weakness in preparedness planning is not a forgotten survival item, or too few cartridges. The invisible weakness is lack of real time experience. It’s one thing to say your going to raise your own food, and maybe you have all the seeds and tools to do it stored away. But if you have never actually planted a huge garden and tried to live off it your first year is going to be full of failures (see: learning opportunities) that could be potentially deadly in real survival time. The same goes for every aspect of survival and emergency situation response. Personally I have always wondered how I would react in a real SHTF situation. Would I freeze? React too slowly? Freak out?…”

READ MORE:

http://www.survivalblog.com/2013/03/dealing-with-mentally-unbalanced-trespassers-by-hearthkeeper.html

PG
About The Author: RSOP is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine, as well as a Family Preparedness Consultant with nearly five years of personal experience in the self-reliance game. RSOP's many preparedness roles within his own group include team mechanic, head of security, electrician, and project designer/engineer.

The Dirty Business Of Post-Collapse Sanitation

Importance of Sanitation after SHTF – The Prepper Journal

“In thinking about preparing your family for survival after a disaster or emergency situation you can’t forget to consider their health. Your family’s health is affected by so much more than having adequate stores of food. Having the best gun for self-defense is great and important, but what if someone in your group comes down with an illness that was easily prevented? What if the killer that attacks you is a sinister little microorganism you never saw coming?…”

Read More:

http://www.theprepperjournal.com/2013/03/17/importance-of-sanitation-after-shtf/

PG
About The Author: RSOP is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine, as well as a Family Preparedness Consultant with nearly five years of personal experience in the self-reliance game. RSOP's many preparedness roles within his own group include team mechanic, head of security, electrician, and project designer/engineer.

Five Rules For Survival

By Riverwalker | From StealthSurvival.Blogspot.com | On Sunday, March 17th, 2013

You must be prepared to take any and all actions necessary if you find yourself in a survival situation.  You will need to be prepared to utilize any and all resources in order to insure your survival. Your skills and your knowledge may be put to the ultimate test. This will be a test that you can’t afford to fail.

Five Rules for Survival

Rule #1 – There are no rules. In a survival situation, your actions shouldn’t be bound by arbitrary rules that may exist and be essential to maintain order and stability in normal times. Things are not going to be anywhere close to normal in a survival situation until you’ve managed to get control of your circumstances.

Rule #2 – There is no guarantee of survival. Despite your best efforts, you or a member of your family or group may not survive. You will need to be prepared for this eventuality if it happens. There will still be family members or others in your group that may be depending upon you for help and guidance.

Rule #3 – There is no second chance. You will need to give it your best effort the first time if you want to survive. You probably won’t get a second chance.

Rule #4 – Don’t depend upon luck to save you. Your luck has probably run out if you find yourself in a survival situation. Put your faith in your knowledge and skills to help you survive.

Rule #5 – Never give up. If you give up, you lose the battle for survival. It’s really that simple.

Got rules for survival?

Staying above the water line!

Riverwalker

Source: http://stealthsurvival.blogspot.com/2013/03/five-rules-for-survival.html

PG
About The Author: RSOP is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine, as well as a Family Preparedness Consultant with nearly five years of personal experience in the self-reliance game. RSOP's many preparedness roles within his own group include team mechanic, head of security, electrician, and project designer/engineer.

Camouflage For The Patriot

Camouflage For The Patriot

This PowerPoint slideshow provides information and examples on proper camouflage techniques regarding clothing and other wearable accessories.

View the slideshow online at:

http://www.slideshare.net/IF109/camouflage-for-the-patriot

PG
About The Author: RSOP is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine, as well as a Family Preparedness Consultant with nearly five years of personal experience in the self-reliance game. RSOP's many preparedness roles within his own group include team mechanic, head of security, electrician, and project designer/engineer.

SHTF Water Sources

SHTF Water Sources – http://uscrow.org

“Emergency SHTF water sources are useful to urban dwellers who’ve bugged in, depleting their water reserves. The electricity is off, this means the pumps are no longer working and water’s nowhere to be found. Don’t sweat it; there are ways to get the water you need…”

Read More: http://uscrow.org/2013/02/15/shtf-water-sources/

PG
About The Author: RSOP is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine, as well as a Family Preparedness Consultant with nearly five years of personal experience in the self-reliance game. RSOP's many preparedness roles within his own group include team mechanic, head of security, electrician, and project designer/engineer.