Tag Archives: greece

Citizens Of Cyprus: This Bailout Is Gonna Cost You…

Cyprus Works On Last-Minute Deal To Soften Bank Levy

By Michele Kambas |From Reuters.com | On Sunday, March 17th, 2013

(Reuters) – Cyprus was working on a last-minute proposal to soften the impact on smaller savers of a bank deposit levy after a parliamentary vote on the measure central to a bailout was postponed until Monday, a government source said.

In a radical departure from previous aid packages, euro zone finance ministers want Cyprus savers to forfeit a portion of their deposits in return for a 10 billion euro ($13 billion) bailout for the island, which has been financially crippled by its exposure to neighboring Greece.

The decision, announced on Saturday morning, stunned Cypriots and caused a run on cash points, most of which were depleted within hours. Electronic transfers were stopped.

The originally proposed levies on deposits are 9.9 percent for those exceeding 100,000 euros and 6.7 percent on anything below that.

The Cypriot government on Sunday discussed with lenders the possibility of changing the levy to 3.0 percent for deposits below 100,000 euros, and to 12.5 percent for above that sum, a source close to the consultations told Reuters on condition of anonymity.

The source said the discussions had the “blessing” of a troika of lenders from the European Commission, the IMF and the European Central Bank.

In Brussels, a spokesman for Olli Rehn, the European commissioner in charge of economic affairs, said discussions were still under way in Cyprus.

“If the Cypriot leaders agree on a more progressive scale for the one-off levy, in view of making it fairer for smaller savers and provided this would have the same financial impact, the Commission would be ready to recommend that the Eurogroup endorse such an agreement,” the spokesman said.

The move to take a percentage of deposits, which could raise almost 6 billion euros, must be ratified by parliament, where no party has a majority. If it fails to do so, President Nicos Anastasiades has warned, Cyprus’s two largest banks will collapse.

One bank, the Cyprus Popular Bank, could have its emergency liquidity assistance (ELA) funding from the European Central Bank cut by March 21.

A default in Cyprus could unravel investor confidence in the euro zone, undoing the improvements fostered by the European Central Bank’s promise last year to do whatever it takes to shore up the currency bloc.

A meeting of parliament scheduled for Sunday was postponed for a day to give more time for consultations and broker a deal, political sources said. The levy was scheduled to come into force on Tuesday, after a bank holiday on Monday.

BREAKS A TABOO

Making bank depositors bear some of the costs of a bailout had been taboo in Europe, but euro zone officials said it was the only way to salvage Cyprus’s financial sector.

European officials said it would not set a precedent.

In Spain, one of four other states getting euro zone help and seen as a possible candidate for a sovereign rescue, officials were quick to say Cyprus was a unique case. A Bank of Spain spokesman said there had been no sign of deposit flight.

But the chief of Greece’s main opposition, the anti-bailout Syriza party, Alexis Tsipras, blamed the move on German Chancellor Angela Merkel, according to Greek state news agency ANA.

“We must all together raise a shield to protect the peoples (of Europe) from Ms Merkel’s criminal strategy,” said Tsipras, who wants a pan-European debt conference to forgive debt.

The crisis is unprecedented in the history of the Mediterranean island, which suffered a war and ethnic split in 1974 in which a quarter of its population was internally displaced.

Anastasiades, elected only three weeks ago, said savers will be compensated by shares in banks guaranteed by future natural gas revenues.

Cyprus is expecting the results of an offshore appraisal drilling this year to confirm the island is sitting on vast amounts of natural gas worth billions.

In a televised address to the nation on Sunday, Anastasiades said he had to accept the tax in return for international aid, or else the island would have faced bankruptcy.

“The solution we concluded upon is not what we wanted, but is the least painful under the circumstances,” Anastasiades said.

With a gross domestic product of barely 0.2 percent of the bloc’s overall output, Cyprus applied for financial aid last June, but negotiations were stalled by the complexity of the deal and the reluctance of the island’s previous president to sign.

International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde, who attended the meeting, said she backed the deal and would ask the IMF board in Washington to contribute to the bailout.

RUSSIANS, EUROPEANS

According to a draft copy of legislation, failing to pay up would be a criminal offence liable to three years in jail or a 50,000 euro fine.

Those affected will include rich Russians with deposits in Cyprus and Europeans who have retired to the island, as well as Cypriots themselves.

“I’m furious,” said Chris Drake, a former Middle East correspondent for the BBC who lives in Cyprus. “There were plenty of opportunities to take our money out; we didn’t because we were promised it was a red line which would not be crossed.”

“I’ve lost several thousand,” he told Reuters.

British finance minister George Osborne told the BBC on Sunday that Britain would compensate its 3,500 military personnel based in Cyprus.

Anastasiades’ right-wing Democratic Rally party, with 20 seats in the 56-member parliament, needs the support of other factions for the vote to pass. It was unclear whether even his coalition partners, the Democratic Party, would fully support the levy.

Cyprus’s Communist party AKEL, accused of stalling on a bailout during its tenure in power until the end of February, would vote against the measure. The socialist Edek party called EU demands “absurd”.

“This is unacceptably unfair and we are against it,” said Adonis Yiangou of the Greens Party, the smallest in parliament but a potential swing vote.

Many Cypriots, having contributed to bailouts for Ireland, Portugal and Greece – Greece’s second bailout contributed to a debt restructuring that blew the 4.5 billion euro hole in Cyprus’s banking sector – are aghast at their treatment by Europe.

Cyprus received a “stab in the back” from its EU partners, the daily Phileleftheros said.

But it and another newspapers highlighted the danger of plunging the banking system into further turmoil if lawmakers sat on the fence.

“Even if the final agreement is wrong, if this is not approved by parliament the damage will be even greater,” Politis economics editor Demetris Georgiades said in an editorial.

Source: http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/03/17/us-cyprus-parliament-idUSBRE92G03I20130317

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About The Author: RSOPerator is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine.

Fund Manager Kyle Bass: “This Ends in War…”

By Tekoa Da Silva | From BullMarketThinking.com | On Friday, December 28th, 2012

In a follow up presentation to the AmeriCatalyst Group, Hayman Capital fund manager Kyle Bass shares thoughts on a number of key issues facing the world over the next few years. Among those that stood out, was the inevitability of a major war, escalation of food riots, and why the government’s job is to maintain confidence over truth.

Excerpts are show here below:

5:00 – “This Ends In War”

“We sit today at the world’s largest peacetime accumulation of debt in world history…you know how this ends right? This ends through war…

I don’t know who’s going to fight who, but I’m fairly certain in the next few years you will see wars erupt, and not just small ones…”

19:00 – “More Social Unrest”

“You’re going to see more social unrest. You saw HUGE riots in Greece, and you’re seeing HUGE riots in other parts of the world over food (and lack of food) and those are actually derivatives of the financial problems that we’re seeing. We’re exporting inflation to some other nations. Going forward it’s going to be a problem.”

24:00 – “They’re Not Going To Tell You”

“They’re not going to tell you [that a collapse is coming]. You’re going to have to see it for yourself. [During the Tequila crisis], the Mexican government affirmed they would not default, that they would not devalue, almost daily. The day after they said “we wont devalue,” they devalued by 60%. The government’s never going to tell you that it’s going to happen.

“Greece’s Yunker said recently, ‘When is becomes serious—you have to lie’. These guys are never going to tell you the truth, because they can’t tell you the truth. Their job is to promote confidence, not to tell you the truth.”

31:00 – “Dinner With The Bank of Japan”

We recently had dinner with the deputy governor of the bank of japan, he just finished a speech denouncing money printing, or quantitative easing. We said ‘Wait a minute, when you expand your balance sheet to buy bonds, we call that money printing, what do you call it?’ He conferred with his advisers, came back and said, ‘When the market tells us it’s money printing, it’ll be money printing. When the rates go up and not down when we buy bonds, THEN it’s monetizing the deficit.”

54:00 – “Where Do We Stand On Gold?”

“We just look at Gold as another currency that you can’t print…Limitless credit creation is probably a bad idea.”

Very revealing indeed. To see these comments coming from one of the world’s leading hedge fund managers is quiet an eye-opener. Thoughts?

This article was originally posted at http://bullmarketthinking.com/kyle-bass-this-ends-in-war-the-governments-never-going-to-tell-you-that-its-going-to-happen/

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About The Author: RSOPerator is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine.

EU Leaders Discuss Possible Greek Exit, Seek Legal Advice

By Beckett Adams | From TheBlaze.com | On June 12th, 2012

As the possibility of a Greek exit becomes more likely, leaders in the European Union are seeking legal advice from the European Commission on how to shift money and keep people within borders, the Associated Press reports.

“European finance officials have discussed limiting the size of withdrawals from ATM machines, imposing border checks and introducing euro zone capital controls as a worst-case scenario should Athens decide to leave the euro,” Reuters reports.

E.U. spokesman Olivier Bailly said Tuesday that, legally, the EU can limit the movement of people and money across national borders “if it’s necessary to protect public order or public security.”

“There is a possibility for member states to restrict movement of capital in specific cases relating to public order and public security,” Bailly told reporters.

Yes, you read that right. The EU can legally limit the movement of people and capital if it deems it a “safety issue.”

Bailly added that the EU cannot restrict the movement of people or money if it’s for “economic reasons.” But who gets to define what’s a “safety issue” and what’s an economic issue? The same people who thought it was a good idea to let Greece into the eurzone?

“Some people are working on scenarios,” he said, but refused to confirm or identify which organizations and people were working on them.

Perhaps hoping to calm anxious investors, Bailly insisted that although multiple scenarios are being discussed, the only one that’s being taken seriously is one where Greece remains in the 17-nation union.

“The Commission is not working on a Greek exit plan,” Bailly said, according to the Wall Street Journal.  “We‘re working on one plan and one plan only and that’s to keep Greece in the euro zone.”

This article was originally posted at http://www.theblaze.com/stories/is-the-eu-preparing-for-a-breakup/

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About The Author: RSOPerator is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine.

Jim Cramer Predicts Run On Banks In Spain & Italy

By Erica Ritz | From The Blaze.com | On May 20th, 2012

Jim Cramer, a former hedge fund manager and the host of CNBC’s Mad Money, was on Meet the Press with David Gregory this morning where the two discussed Europe’s economic woes and the worldwide ramifications of the disaster.

“I’m predicting bank runs [in] Spain and Italy within the next few weeks.  Without a coordinated policy, there is going to be financial anarchy in Europe and [it's] going to cause a slowdown worldwide, China and here.”

Watch the interaction, below:

Just a few days ago, Cramer was discussing the run on Greek banks and how it would become a “slippery slope.”

“This is not Argentina and Brazil in the 80′s,” he said, “these are big countries.”

The Street TV, which conducted the interview, summarized: “Our Banks Can’t Outrun European Banks.”

This article was originally posted at http://www.theblaze.com/stories/financial-anarchy-jim-cramer-predicts-a-run-on-banks-in-spain-and-italy-within-weeks/

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About The Author: RSOPerator is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine.

Greek Bank Run Showing More Signs As Greece Citizens Line Up At ATMs

By Allan Soldner | From Z6Mag.com | On May 15th, 2012

Greek Bank RunIt was confirmed by the President of Greece, “that the strength of banks is very weak right now.” Multiple reports including the President of Greece has reported that on Monday alone nearly $898 Million or €700 million Euros were withdrawn from Greek banks.

The tipping for for a Greek Bank Run has picked up steam as the news spreads across the world. As soon as the news started spreading to other news publications which started with the Wall Street Journal’s report, “Greek Depositors Withdrew $898 Million From Banks Monday” markets started to fall.

On top of the JP Morgan Chase & Company drama that has unfolded with the $2 billion in losses the

Greek run on banks seemed to fuel the loss of any positive territory the DOW, S&P 500 or NASDAQ had at the closing bell. The DOW ended down -63.35, the S&P 500 down -7.69 and the NASDAQ down -8.82.

The stock market in the US and the precious metals market fell nearly in sync. Gold bullion prices and Silver Bullion prices fell fairly significant amounts in lockstep with the drops of the US Stock market. Gold price was down $17.20 today ending at $1.545.30 at 5pm EDT and Silver price was down .65 cents today ending at $27.77 an ounce.

Other pressures on the market was the euro tumbling to four month lows when compared to the US Dollar which in turn had the same effect on precious metals pricing. What everyone is holding their breath trying to figure out is whether the Greek bank run will continue and erode the total deposits held by Greece’s Central Bank of €165.36 billion reported in March 2012.

A report from Tyler Durden at ZeroHedge.com asked the same question in a post called, “Has the Greek Bank Run Started?” On that post while mentioning the withdrawal numbers from Greek bank accounts there are also pictures that are shown there of citizens of Greece lining up at ATMs. ATM lines are often the hysteria that starts the ball rolling even worse in any bank run because people walking by start asking if they should be doing the same. We’re sharing pictures of those Greek ATM lines below.

The original article was posted at http://z6mag.com/business/greek-bank-run-showing-more-signs-as-greece-citizens-line-up-at-atms-169333.html

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About The Author: RSOPerator is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine.

Greek Bank Withdrawls Fuel Fears Of Bank Run

By Brian Blackstone & David Enrich | From WSJ.com | On Tuesday, May 15th, 2012

Greek depositors withdrew €700 million ($898 million) from the country’s banks on Monday, fueling fears of a bank run amid the growing political disarray.

With deposits falling, Greek banks become even more dependent on the European Central Bank to meet their funding needs, exposing the central bank to potentially huge losses if Greece leaves the euro area.

Greek President Karolos Papoulias told the country’s political leaders that bank withdrawals plus buy orders received by Greek banks for German bunds totaled some €800 million on Monday, a transcript of his comments said. A central bank official confirmed the figures.

The original article was posted at http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303505504577406310678151998.html?mod=WSJ_hp_LEFTTopStories#articleTabs%3Darticle

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About The Author: RSOPerator is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine.

Fitch Cuts Greece To ‘CCC’ On Possible EMU Exit

By Sue Chang | From MarketWatch.com | On Thursday, May 17th, 2012

SAN FRANCISCO (MarketWatch) — Fitch Ratings on Thursday downgraded Greece’s sovereign rating to CCC from B- due to heightened risk that Greece may have to exit the Economic and Monetary Union. The strong showing of political parties opposing austerity in the recent election and the failure of the parties to form a government underscores the lack of national support for the E.U.-IMF bailout program, Fitch said. “In the event that the new general elections scheduled for June 17 fail to produce a government with a mandate to continue with the E.U.-IMF program of fiscal austerity and structural reform, an exit of Greece from EMU would be probable,” said Fitch in a statement. A Greek exit from the EMU is likely to result in defaults in the private sector as well as sovereign euro-denominated obligations, the ratings agency said. Triple-C grade is categorized as “poor quality” with possibility of default.

The original article was posted at http://www.marketwatch.com/story/fitch-cuts-greece-to-ccc-on-possible-emu-exit-2012-05-17

EDITOR’S NOTE: According to Wikipedia, A CCC bond rating means: An obligor is CURRENTLY VULNERABLE, and is dependent upon favourable business, financial, and economic conditions to meet its financial commitments. According to Fitch, anything below a B/B- has reached junk bond status.

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About The Author: RSOPerator is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine.

Europe’s Future Is Not Up To The Bundesbank

By George Soros | From FT.com | On April 11, 2012

George Soros

George Soros

Far from abating, the euro crisis has recently taken a turn for the worse. The European Central Bank relieved an incipient credit crunch through its longer-term refinancing operations. The resulting rally in financial markets hid an underlying deterioration; but that is unlikely to last much longer.

The fundamental problems have not been resolved; indeed, the gap between creditor and debtor countries continues to widen. The crisis has entered what may be a less volatile but more lethal phase.

At the onset of the crisis, the eurozone’s break-up was inconceivable: assets and liabilities denominated in the common currency were so intermingled that it would have caused an uncontrollable meltdown. But, as the crisis has progressed, the eurozone has been reoriented along national lines.

The LTRO enabled Spanish and Italian banks to engage in very profitable and low-risk arbitrage in their own countries’ bonds. And the preferential treatment received by the ECB on its Greek bonds will discourage other investors from holding sovereign debt. If this continues for a few more years, a eurozone break-up would become possible without a meltdown – but would leave creditor countries’ central banks holding big claims that would be hard to enforce against debtor countries’ central banks.

The Bundesbank has seen the danger. It is now campaigning against the indefinite expansion of the money supply, and it has started taking measures to limit the losses it would sustain in a break-up. This is creating a self-fulfilling prophecy: once the Bundesbank starts guarding against a break-up, everybody will have to do the same. Markets are beginning to reflect this.

The Bundesbank is also tightening credit at home. This would be the right policy if Germany was a freestanding country, but the eurozone’s heavily indebted members badly need stronger demand from Germany to avoid recession. Without it, the eurozone’s fiscal compact, agreed last December, cannot possibly work. The heavily indebted countries will either fail to implement the necessary measures or, if they do, they will fail to meet their targets because of collapsing demand. Either way, debt ratios will rise, and the competitiveness gap with Germany will widen.

Whether or not the euro endures, Europe is facing a long period of economic stagnation or worse. Other countries have gone through similar experiences. Latin American countries suffered a lost decade after 1982, and Japan has been stagnating for a quarter of a century; both have survived. But the European Union is not a country and it is unlikely to survive. The deflationary debt trap threatens to destroy a still-incomplete political union.

The only way to escape the trap is to recognise that current policies are counterproductive and change course. I cannot propose a cut-and-dried plan, only some guidelines. First, the rules governing the eurozone have failed and need radical revision. Defending a status quo that is unworkable only makes matters worse. Second, the current situation is highly anomalous, and exceptional measures are needed to restore normality. Finally, new rules must allow for financial markets’ inherent instability.

To be realistic, the fiscal compact must be the starting point, although some obvious defects will need to be modified. The compact should count commercial as well as financial debts and budgets should distinguish between investments that pay and current spending. To avoid cheating, what qualifies as investment should be subject to approval by a European authority. An enlarged European Investment Bank could then co-finance investments.

Most important, some new, extraordinary measures are needed to return conditions to normal. The EU’s fiscal charter compels member states to reduce their public debt annually by one-twentieth of the amount by which they exceed 60 per cent of gross domestic product. I propose that member states jointly reward good behaviour by taking over that obligation. They have transferred to the ECB their seignorage rights, valued at €2tn-€3tn by Willem Buiter of Citibank and Huw Pill of Goldman Sachs, working independently. A special-purpose vehicle owning the rights could use the ECB to finance the cost of acquiring the bonds without violating Article 123 of the Lisbon treaty.

Should a country violate the fiscal compact, it would be obliged to pay interest on all or part of the debt owned by the SPV. That would surely impose tough fiscal discipline.

By rewarding good behaviour, the fiscal compact would no longer constitute a deflationary debt trap. The outlook would radically improve. In addition, to narrow the competitiveness gap, all members should be able to refinance existing debt at the same interest rate. But that would require greater fiscal integration. It would have to be phased in gradually.

The Bundesbank will never accept these proposals, but the European authorities ought to take them seriously. The future of Europe is a political issue: it is beyond the Bundesbank’s competence to decide.

The writer is chairman of Soros Fund Management. His latest book is titled ‘Coming Soon: Financial Turmoil in Europe and the United States’

The original article can be viewed at http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/f7ac05c8-82fa-11e1-ab78-00144feab49a.html

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About The Author: RSOPerator is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine.

A Harder Default To Come

By Wolf Richter | From TestosteronePit.com | On Friday, March 9, 2012

“We owed it to our children and grandchildren to rid them of the burden of this debt,” said Greek Finance Minister Evangelos Venizelos about the bond swap that had just whacked private sector investors with a 72% loss. While everyone other than the bondholders was applauding, the drumbeat of Greece’s economic horror show continued in its relentless manner.

In central Athens, a stunning 29.6% of the businesses ceased operations, up from 24.4% in August; in Piraeus 27.3%, a 10-point jump since March. The whole Attica region lost 25.6% of its businesses. “This worsening of the survival index in the commercial sector … shows that resistance is waning,” said Vasilis Korkidis, president of the National Confederation of Hellenic Commerce. “We must continue the battle of daily survival and keep our shops open,” he pleaded—while fourth quarter GDP was being revised down to -7.5% on an annual basis. The Greek economy has shrunk about 20% since 2008.

Unemployment is veering toward disaster. The overall rate of 21% in December, announced Thursday, was horrid enough, but youth unemployment rose to a shocking 51.1%, double the rate before the crisis. A record 1,033,507 people were unemployed, up 41% over prior year. Only 3,899,319 people had jobs—a mere 36.1% of a total population of 10.8 million!

No economy can service a gargantuan—and rapidly growing—mountain of debt when only 36.1% of its people contribute (by comparison, the US employment population ratio is 58.6%, down from 64.7% in 2000). Hence, another bout of red ink. The “cash deficit” at the end of 2011 hit €24.9 billion, 11.5% of GDP, far above the general budget deficit. Government-owned enterprises, such as the public healthcare sector, couldn’t pay their bills. Total owed their suppliers: €5.73 billion.

Yet, forcing down the deficit is one of the many conditions that the bailout Troika of EU, ECB, and IMF have imposed on Greece. And: “If the Greek people or the Greek political elite do not apply all of these conditions, they exclude themselves from the Eurozone,” said Luxembourg’s Finance Minister Luc Frieden. All of these conditions. Then he added the crucial words: “The impact on other countries now will be less important than a year ago.” Read…. Firewalls In Place, Markets ready: Greece Can Go To Heck.

Under pressure to cut its healthcare budget, the government reduced the prices that the industry can charge state-owned insurers. So wholesalers are selling their limited supply outside Greece, while out-of-money state-owned insurers delay payments to pharmacies and hospitals, which then can’t pay their wholesalers for the medications they do get. In return, wholesalers turn off the spigot. And the system is locking up.

Even Health Minister Andreas Loverdos conceded that there were shortages, but that they were limited to lower-priced medications. Of the 500 most common drugs, 243 have disappeared from the shelves, including antibiotics and drugs for treating diabetes and hypertension. The Panhellenic Association of Women with Breast Cancer, for example, received many complaints from patients who claim they weren’t treated due to lack of oncology drugs. And the world’s largest pharmaceutical companies are worried that Greece and some other countries might not be able to pay them at all.

A bright spot: tourism. In 2011, receipts rose by 9.5% over prior year as the Arab Spring had scared tourists away from destinations such as Egypt and Tunisia. In July, receipts jumped 14.4% and in October 15%. Alas, in December they declined 4.9%. And that reversal has now infected 2012. Tourist arrivals so far this year are down 10.7% in Athens and 6.7% for the country. Its last growth industry has hit the skids, too.

With unemployment climbing, production and consumption tanking, businesses shutting down, and tourism nose-diving, there is only one way for tax revenues: down. Budget deficits will be worse than promised. Greece’s debt—now largely to taxpayers of other countries—will continue to balloon. The standard of living of the vast majority of Greeks will get slammed, though the elite that are negotiating these deals will do just fine.

“We still don’t have a solution for Greece, so there will be a harder default to come,” predicted Charles Wyplosz, director of the Geneva-based International Center for Money and Banking Studies. Yet, in a bitter irony, Germany—the country where tax dodging is a national sport—has decided to send 160 employees of its Ministry of Finance to Athens to fix against all odds the tax collection system, a debacle that will endear the already reviled Germans even more to the Greeks. Read…. Final Spasm: Greco-Teutonic Wrestling.

The original article can be viewed at http://www.testosteronepit.com/home/2012/3/9/a-harder-default-to-come.html

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About The Author: RSOPerator is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine.

Moody’s Declares Greece in Default of Debt

From Yahoo! News Canada via AFP

Moody’s declared Greece in default on its debt Friday after Athens carved out a deal with private creditors for a bond exchange that will write off 107 billion euros ($140 billion) of its debt.

Moody’s pointed out that even as 85.8 percent of the holders of Greek-law bonds had signed onto the deal, the exercise of collective action clauses that Athens is applying to its bonds will force the remaining bondholders to participate.

Overall the cost to bondholders, based on the net present value of the debt, will be at least 70 percent of the investment, Moody’s said.

“According to Moody’s definitions, this exchange represents a ‘distressed exchange,’ and therefore a debt default,” the US-based rating firm said.

For one, “The exchange amounts to a diminished financial obligation relative to the original obligation.”

Secondly, it “has the effect of allowing Greece to avoid payment default in the future.”

Ahead of the debt deal, Moody’s had already slashed Greece’s credit grade to its lowest level, “C,” and so there was no impact on the rating.

Moody’s said it will revisit the rating to see how the debt writedown, and the second eurozone bailout package, would affect its finances.

However, it added, at the beginning of March “Moody’s had said that the risk of a default, even after the debt exchange has been completed, remains high.”

This article was originally posted at: http://ca.news.yahoo.com/moodys-declares-greece-default-debt-232804003.html

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About The Author: RSOPerator is the co-founder & Executive Editor of Radical Survivalism Webzine.